Number of Plants Needed to Feed a Family of Six 6

03/13/2017 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

As we start the vegetable planting season this April, the top question asked here at Watters Garden Center is how many plants are needed to feed a family. It does vary by family and garden, but here are some basic…

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Heat Tolerant Greens and Lettuce

05/20/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Salads don’t have to end with spring! A crisp, colorful salad may be the perfect dish on a hot summer’s day, and some varieties of greens excel despite the heat. Sowing heat-tolerant greens keeps your fridge crisper full of healthful,…

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Nasturtiums – Edible or No??

05/09/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

All parts of nasturtiums are edible! The leaves can be used as a peppery substitute for watercress in salads and on sandwiches; the flowers make a gorgeous edible garnish for salads, hors d’oeuvres trays, and fruit salads; and unripe nasturtium seeds can…

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Royal Burgundy Bush Bean non-GMO $1.89

05/05/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Royal Burgundy has delicious purple pods that are amazingly easy to grow and find among the backdrop of green foliage. It grows better than other bean types in cool weather, is very disease resistant and unlikely to be challenged by…

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Recipes for preparing Prickly Pear Cactus Pads

05/03/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Prickly Pear Creole 2 cups of diced cactus – remove spine with a knife first 1 pound of hamburger (cooked and drained) 6 ounces of tomato paste 1 cup of water 2 diced Jalapeño pepper
s 6 1/2 ounces of canned shrimp…

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Pea Shelling Wando

05/03/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Introduced in 1943, Wando is a cross between Laxton’s Progress (an English pea) and Perfection (a New England heirloom). It is cold tolerant for early sowing, and more heat tolerant than other pea varieties. 18″ – 30″ plants with 7…

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Squash Winter Red Kuri

05/01/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Once you try these teardrop-shaped 3-4 pound fruits, they’ll become an essential part of your fall and winter cooking. “Kuri” is Japanese for chestnut, a tribute to its nutty flavor. Its smooth consistency and deep color make it a favorite…

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Cabbage Copenhagen

05/01/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Introduced by H. Hartman & Company in 1909, Copenhagen cabbage has been a gardener’s favorite for over a century. 6″-8″ diameter and 3-4 lbs., it is compact, tightly-wrapped, and perfect for small gardens. It is the standard of excellence for…

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Muskmelon, Cantaloupe & Honeydew – what’s the difference?

04/19/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

Summertime Melons in the Garden What we call cantaloupes are really muskmelons. True cantaloupes are hard-shelled melons from Europe. Honeydew melons are different from muskmelons in that the skin is smooth, the flesh is green, and the scent is markedly different.…

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Winter Squash Guide

03/30/2016 Ken Lain, mountain gardener

What a diverse and versatile vegetable! From tender, green, white, and yellow summer squash to even more varied colors of winter squash with thick rinds and stringy interiors, there is a squash for all occasions. Summer and winter squashes are…

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